Chanter Shanty town – 9/06/21

To listen press on the audio player below
(you can also download the file –
click on the three dots on the right):


Fauré‘s last song cycle, L’horizon chimérique, sung by its original interpreter, Charles Panzéra:

1. La mer est infinie et mes rêves sont fous
0:00
2. Je me suis embarqué sur un vasseau qui danse
1:18
3. Diane, Séléné lune de beau métal
3:36
4. Vaisseux, nous vous aurons aimés en pure perte
5:06

poems by Jean de la Ville de Mirmont.
(click on a title for the original text plus an English translation,
or a timing to hear that individual song)


By way of contrast, John Ireland‘s setting of John Masefield’s famous poem:

Sea Fever text


How do you prevent a punch-up in the pub? Get everyone singing, how else? Britten‘s Peter Grimes:


Debussy‘s ear at its best. The – for me – almost miraculous end of Act 1 of Pelléas et Mélisande (not too sure about the graphics, though).


More Britten. the crew of the Indomitable not mutinying but sharing a sea-song in Billy Budd:


Careful who you invite to your party; some guests can turn out to be just diabolical! Wagner‘s Flying Dutchman‘s crew ruin a good get-together:


Lotte Lenya, brilliantly terrifying as Brecht and Weill‘s Pirate Jenny. This is the English American language version which differs significantly from the original German. You can see that, and a fairly literal translation of it, below:

Original text in German with English translation


An antidote.

Join the happy queue of Watteau and Poulenc‘s passengers as they wait to set sail for the joyous isle of Cythera (got your embarkation card ready?)


Any copyrighted material on these pages is included as “fair use”, for the purpose of study, and critical analysis only, and will be removed at the request of the copyright owner(s).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.